Tag: compassion

How to Respond When Someone Lacks Compassion?

When we’re driven by compassion, it can be disheartening to encounter apathy or lack of compassion for animals and other pressing issues in our world today. I’m often asked how to respond in such circumstances. Here is my response.

Vegan Breakfast and Brunch Recipes

We had a fabulous time in our Breakfast & Brunch Class, and I’m still reaping the rewards (READ: eating the leftovers)! The On-Demand Class is now available for you to enjoy the video and recipes! 

Thank you for supporting a small vegan business. xo

PURCHASE THE ON-DEMAND BREAKFAST RECIPES + VIDEO

  • Fluffy Pancakes
  • Maple Tempeh Bacon
  • Strawberries ‘n Custard Parfait

…plus I shared David’s recipe and secrets for making a STRAWBERRY SIMPLE SYRUP to add to sparkling wine or sparkly soda. GET YOUR RECIPES TODAY!  

$9.99

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See listing for my online cooking classes here!

For more on living and cooking vegan (i.e. compassionately and healthfully), my books are here to help:

The Joy of Vegan Baking 

The Vegan Table

Color Me Vegan

Vegan’s Daily Companion

The 30-Day Vegan Challenge

The Joyful Vegan

How to Not Be Cynical About the World

WARNING: Life-changing revelation! In this episode, I explain why it’s fruitless to be surprised that a fig tree produces figs. Trust me. You’ll want to hear this. 

As always, you can find lots of resources for living compassionately and healthfully at joyfulvegan.com, you can find my books wherever books are sold, and you can join me in my online cooking classes or in an upcoming vegan trip.

Mindful Eating

In this episode, I explain the benefits of eating with awareness and provide suggestions for mindful eating. 

As always, you can find lots of resources for living compassionately and healthfully at joyfulvegan.com, you can find my books wherever books are sold, and you can join me in my online cooking classes or in an upcoming vegan trip.

14-YEAR PODCAST ANNIVERSARY: A HUMBLE LOVE FEST

Every single person who has ever written me an email or a kind comment has shaped who I am, has provided me with hope, and has guided the work I do to help create a compassionate world. May the stories you hear in this FOURTEEN-YEAR PODCAST ANNIVERSARY do the same for you. So put your feet up (or get them moving), and take in the beautiful responses I’ve received from listeners, followers, and students this past year. I hope you are as moved by the letters as I am humbled by them.

The Meaning of Compassion

Unfortunately, compassion is terribly misrepresented, mischaracterized, and misunderstood in our society such that many people think that if someone behaves badly (unethically, immorally, unjustly, even violently) then they don’t deserve compassion, because that would imply that you condone that bad behavior. Nothing could be further from the truth.

The truth is compassion doesn’t condone bad behavior; it helps transcend it. This is so key, because too many of us walk around thinking that if we’re compassionate to people who do bad, violent, rude or inappropriate things we’re condoning that behavior — and since of course we DON’T  condone bad, rude, violent behavior — then we think it logically follows that we have to withhold compassion … to demonstrate that we oppose that bad, violent, rude, or inappropriate behavior? Right? 

Many of us consciously or unconsciously say:

“I’m not going to have compassion for…slaughterhouse workers, animal farmers, animal abusers, hunters, people who test on animals, people who eat animals, conservatives, liberals, [fill-in-the-blank]— because…they don’t deserve my compassion,” and so we make our compassion conditional or treat it like it’s a prize to be bestowed upon someone based on merit or worth.

Compassion is a gift to be bestowed. It’s not a prize to be awarded or withheld. Where there is the absence of compassion means there is a need for more compassion — not less. 

In today’s podcast episode, I talk about the meaning of compassion in a presentation I was invited to give for a special event by Rancho Compasion, a farmed animal sanctuary founded by Miyoko Schinner. 

Animal-Friendly Gardens: Plants, Flowers, and Trees Named After Animals

The thousands of animal-related words and expressions we have in our English language illustrate how deeply connected we are to animals, and that’s never more apparent than in the names of plants — both the common names and the botanical names. Join me on this fun journey through gardens, fields, and forests as we discover plants, trees, flowers, and fungi named after animals.

Justice Begins Here

The problem isn’t that we wake up in the morning wanting to contribute to cruelty or violence. The problem is that we don’t wake up in the morning wanting to create compassion, peace, and nonviolence. 

If that were on our to-do list every day, imagine what we could accomplish. Imagine what our world would be like.

The good news is that imagining our vision for a compassionate, just world is the first step to realizing it. 

Don’t underestimate the power of thought; it shapes our perceptions, it determines our actions, and it creates the world we envision.

They Killed Him, and It Broke Us, and It Should Have

Our country has been a tinderbox for decades — and the last three-and-a-half years have been a slow, steady, daily burn of anxiety, dread, anger, and pain.

Adding severe strain to an already volatile situation and vulnerable population, a deadly pandemic came along and pressed us even more. Job loss. Fear. Insecurity. Isolation. Debt. Disparity. Disease. Death.⁠

Severing our already-tenuous connections — as fellow Americans, as fellow human beings — we chose divisiveness, disdain, denial, mockery, and blame. Mirroring a small, selfish Twitter troll, we became no better in our rhetoric, perspective, and actions. ⁠

And then…George Floyd. They killed him, and it broke us. And it should have.⁠

[Tweet “George Floyd. They killed him, and it broke us. And it should have.⁠”]

But it is precisely our shared shock, sadness, and outrage that have the potential to put us together again. We are not indifferent. We are not complacent. We are not apathetic. We witnessed. We saw. We snapped — understandably so. ⁠
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It is exactly because our vision, our expectation, our hope for a just and compassionate world has been thwarted that our anger is fueled. If we didn’t believe such a world was possible — and self-evident — we would be indifferent. ⁠

But we are not. And for that I am grateful. In that I am hopeful. ⁠

The question now is not “What have we done?” But “What will we do?” “What do we want?” and “Who do we want to be?”

The answers to these questions reflect our character and determine our destiny — both individually and collectively — and I’m both terrified and hopeful for the future. ⁠

It’s in our hands. And no one else’s. It always has been. And it always will be.  

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