Tag: cooking

Old English Pigs and Old French Pork: The Linguistic Cleaving of Animals

Roughly 10,000 new words entered the English language during the Norman occupation and assimilation, particularly those having to do with the world of the ruling class.

The effects of the linguistic class division are most apparent in the culinary realm, where words used by the aristocracy have French origins and words used by the commoners have Germanic origins.

This is evident even today in the way we talk about certain animals, particularly those typically eaten by Westerners, with words rooted in Anglo-Saxon / Old English to indicate the living animals and words rooted in Old French to indicate the slaughtered animal as flesh for consumption. 

{RECIPE} Cauliflower Risotto with Green Veggies

After sharing a short video of this risotto on Instagram (see below), I received a number of requests for the recipe, so here it is. Long a favorite vegetable of mine, cauliflower seems to be coming into its own in the public sphere. This version of risotto may be taking liberties with risotto’s traditional foundation, but it’s much more nutrient-dense and much less calorie-dense than the Arborio rice version.

NOTE: For the version in the video, I added roasted Brussels sprouts (and didn’t add the peas and sundried tomatoes as directed below. The recipe lends itself to much variety depending on what green veggies you have on hand.)

[Tweet “{RECIPE} Enjoy this nutrient-dense, easy-to-make, delicious take on traditional risotto. YUMMERS!”]

Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 onion, diced
1 head cauliflower, pulsed in a food processor bowl to resemble rice-size pieces
3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1/2 cup (125 ml) dry white wine
1/2 cup (125 ml) vegetable stock
1/4 cup (60 ml) plant-based creamer or thick plant-based milk, such as cashew or almond
1 cup (110 g) English peas (frozen or fresh)
2 tablespoons chopped sundried tomatoes
1 tablespoon lemon zest
1/4 cup (30 g) toasted pine nuts, almond slivers, or walnut pieces
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley and/or thyme
Salt and pepper, to taste

Directions

Heat the oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onion, and sauté until translucent, about 4 minutes. Add the cauliflower and garlic, season with salt and pepper, and sauté for 3 more minutes.

Deglaze the pan with the wine and cook, stirring constantly, until the liquid is almost evaporated. Add the vegetable stock and creamer, and bring it to a simmer. Stir in the peas and sundried tomatoes, and cook until the cauliflower is tender, about 5 to 7 minutes.

Remove from heat and add the lemon zest, nuts, herbs and a drizzle of olive oil.

ROASTED BRUSSELS SPROUTS: As per the Brussels sprouts in the video, I just cut off the ends, sliced them in half, tossed them with some olive oil, salt, and pepper, and roasted them in a 425-degree oven for 15 minutes, or until they were crispy on the outside and cooked through on the inside.)

Yield: Serves 2

Soy-free, wheat-free, gluten-free

{Recipe} Homemade Vegan Sausage

Hear ye! Hear ye! These sausages are pig-free and gluten-full. I have neither a pig-full nor a gluten-free version, so enjoy this one that will blow your mind. You can also watch a video demonstration I did on a Live Facebook Broadcast. See below. 

ADVANCE PREPARATION REQUIRED to make the lentils. Brown lentils take less than 30 minutes to make from scratch, but you can use canned, if you wish. Drain first, and you’ll still want to puree them. Makes 6 sausages

Corn not included.

INGREDIENTS

1 cup cooked brown lentils, mashed or pureed
1 1/4 cups vital wheat gluten (I always buy a box of 4 packages to keep them on hand.)
1/4 cup nutritional yeast flakes
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon anise seeds (you can also use 1 tablespoon crushed fennel seeds)
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes (my favorite is chipotle)
1 teaspoon smoked paprika (regular paprika will do)
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried tarragon
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 cup vegetable broth
2 tablespoons tamari soy sauce

DIRECTIONS

Cook your lentils so you have 1 cup cooked. I always make a little more than I need for this recipe so I have another batch on hand for another. When they are cooked, puree them in a food processor or mash them by hand.

Have at the ready 6 square sheets of aluminum foil. Set aside.

Combine all the dry ingredients, then add the pureed brown lentils, the vegetable broth, and the tamari. Combine thoroughly. It will come together pretty quickly. The more you mix once it’s combined, the more you’re working the gluten, which will result in chewier sausages. You’ll get a feel for how much you want to mix the more you make these.

Divide the mixture into 6 equal parts. I usually just eyeball this, but don’t worry about being perfect; you can always break up or add to a sausage once you make one, so just do your best. (See the video for how I do it.)

Place one part of the mix onto a sheet of foil, and mold into a 6-inch log. Roll it up in the foil. Place each of the 6 sausages in a steamer, and steam for 30 minutes.

Once they’re steamed, you can store them in the refrigerator for future eating, but why would you do that? Eat now. Unwrap them, grill them up or pan-fry with a little oil. Then, stick them in a bun with all the fixings, chop them up to make sausage biscuits and gravy, or cut them up and add them to a stew. They’re absolutely delicious, and yes, your Uncle Harry will think you just fed him a sausage from a cut-up pig, so even he’ll be happy. They’re that good.

VARIATIONS

Consider this a base and vary your herbs and spices to your liking. It’s a flexible recipe waiting for your special touch. Just don’t add pigs. Thank you.

[Tweet “Check out this delicious homemade sausage recipe. Pig-free. Gluten-full. Flavor-packed.”]

Food Rainbow

As an educator around the ethics of food, my message for eating compassionately is simple: make choices that reflect your own values of compassion and kindness. When it comes to eating healthfully, my message is equally simple: eat by color… For more, listen below.

Eat Your Vegetables

Despite Mom’s standard mealtime instruction, we’re eating fewer vegetables than ever. In this radio editorial, I suggest some ways to reverse the trend.

Compassion

When Colleen Patrick-Goudreau prepares her meals, she isn’t selective in her compassion for living things.

Good Day Sacramento – Reading Labels

Good Day reporters Melissa Cabral and Sean Bennett are taking The 30-Day Vegan Challenge! In Week 2, we talk about eating healthfully affordably and reading labels.

GET YOUR FREE JOYFUL VEGAN GUIDE

Includes delicious plant-based recipes and a meal plan!




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