Tag: cows

My Prayer for Humans on Behalf of Animals

My hope is that we can navigate through this world with the grace and integrity of those who most need our protection.

May we have the sense of humor and liveliness of the goats; may we have the maternal instincts and protective nature of the hens and the sassiness of the roosters.

May we have the gentleness and strength of the cattle and the wisdom, humility, and serenity of the donkeys.

May we appreciate the need for community as do the sheep and choose our companions as carefully as do the rabbits.

May we have the faithfulness and commitment to family of the geese, the adaptability and affability of the ducks.

May we have the intelligence, loyalty, and affection of the pigs and the inquisitiveness, sensitivity, and playfulness of the turkeys.

My hope is that we can learn from the animals what we need to become better people.

May it be so.

Please feel free to share this text, share any of the graphics on your social media pages, or print either version of the PDF. One is titled A Prayer for Humans; one is titled A Hope for Humans.

PDF: Prayer for Humans on Behalf of Animals

PDF: Hope for Humans on Behalf of Animals

I Can’t Be Vegan. I’m Mexican…I’m French…I’m Irish…

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We often hear that being vegan is incongruent with being…well, name it. I can’t be vegan, because…I’m Mexican, I’m French . . . My family is Puerto Rican. I have Italian blood . . .I come from Irish stock. You get the idea.

MOST cultures have a history of heavy meat- and/or dairy-consumption, particularly as they became wealthier and more industrialized. (Although if you go back far enough, plant foods played a more significant role than they do now).

Food IS a unique expression of culture, but we have to ask:

“Is my cultural heritage reason enough to not make some changes that are in alignment with my current values?”

and

“Are there other ways I can celebrate my cultural heritage while still honoring my desire to be vegan?”

After all, despite meat, dairy, and eggs being prevalent in many cuisines, so are plant foods.

With a vegan’s-eye view of the world, we can just as easily and legitimately celebrate our family history and cultural traditions through the vegetables, fruits, grains, beans, lentils, fungi, herbs, and spices that characterize the cuisine of our heritage—whatever that heritage might be.

(Tired of Excuses? Take The 30-Day Vegan Challenge today!) 

Cows Aren’t Killed for Milk, So What’s Wrong with Drinking It?

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?Cows are absolutely killed for their milk. I can’t say this enough: There is no such thing as a slaughter-free animal agriculture system. ⁣

A cow’s life is only as valuable as the amount of milk she is able to “produce”; when she is no longer “profitable,” she is killed. ⁣

It is simply not economically viable to feed, shelter, treat, and house animals for the rest of their lives and generate no profit in return. ⁣ ⁣

Whether she is used on a small farm, an organic farm, a “humane” farm, a “family-owned” farm, an artisan farm, a whatever-it’s-called-farm, she is killed. ⁣ ⁣

Cattle have a natural life expectancy of 15 or 20 years, but dairy cows are sent to slaughter at about 4 to 5 years young. ⁣ ⁣

We have no physiological need to consume the milk of another animal. But don’t we have a moral obligation to not cause suffering when we can avoid doing so? ⁣ ⁣

We can still enjoy creamy, delicious milks made from plants — that don’t come with inevitable suffering, slaughter, and environmental degradation.

(Tired of Excuses? Take The 30-Day Vegan Challenge today!) 

“If the World Went Vegan, We Would be Overrun with Animals” and Other Hypotheticals

“What would happen to all the animals if we stopped eating them? Wouldn’t we be overrun with cows and pigs and chickens if we stopped?” “If everyone stopped eating these animals, they would go extinct. Is that what you want, Ms. Vegan and Mr. Vegan? You don’t care if these animals go extinct??” Join me today as I address these questions. 

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Old English Pigs and Old French Pork: The Linguistic Cleaving of Animals

Roughly 10,000 new words entered the English language during the Norman occupation and assimilation, particularly those having to do with the world of the ruling class. The effects of the linguistic class division are most apparent in the culinary realm, where words used by the aristocracy have French origins and words used by the commoners have Germanic origins. This is evident even today in the way we talk about certain animals, particularly those typically eaten by Westerners, with words rooted in Anglo-Saxon / Old English to indicate the living animals and words rooted in Old French to indicate the slaughtered animal as flesh for consumption. 

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