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Tag: food

Eating Crow? Try Eating Humble Pie, Instead

If you’ve made a serious faux pas and need to acknowledge it with humility, you might be said to be “eating crow” or “eating humble pie,” both phrases of which involve animals — or do they? 

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Coccyx: Please Don’t Sit on the Cuckoo

Coccyx is a small triangle-shaped bone at the base of the spinal column in humans and other apes, such as gibbons, orangutans, gorillas, and chimpanzees.

Representing a vestigial tail and most commonly called the tailbone, coccyx was the name given to this part of our anatomy by ancient Greek physician Galen because of its resemblance to an animal, making the word an “animalogy.”

Can you guess the etymology? All is revealed in this episode of Animalogy, a podcast about language and the animal-related words and expressions we use every day.

There's an animal hiding in your tailbone! Listen to Animalogy podcast find out more. Click To Tweet

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{Recipe} Homemade Vegan Sausage

Hear ye! Hear ye! These sausages are pig-free and gluten-full. I have neither a pig-full nor a gluten-free version, so enjoy this one that will blow your mind. You can also watch a video demonstration I did on a Live Facebook Broadcast. See below. 

ADVANCE PREPARATION REQUIRED to make the lentils. Brown lentils take less than 30 minutes to make from scratch, but you can use canned, if you wish. Drain first, and you’ll still want to puree them. Makes 6 sausages

Corn not included.

INGREDIENTS

1 cup cooked brown lentils, mashed or pureed
1 1/4 cups vital wheat gluten (I always buy a box of 4 packages to keep them on hand.)
1/4 cup nutritional yeast flakes
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon anise seeds (you can also use 1 tablespoon crushed fennel seeds)
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes (my favorite is chipotle)
1 teaspoon smoked paprika (regular paprika will do)
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried tarragon
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 cup vegetable broth
2 tablespoons tamari soy sauce

DIRECTIONS

Cook your lentils so you have 1 cup cooked. I always make a little more than I need for this recipe so I have another batch on hand for another. When they are cooked, puree them in a food processor or mash them by hand.

Have at the ready 6 square sheets of aluminum foil. Set aside.

Combine all the dry ingredients, then add the pureed brown lentils, the vegetable broth, and the tamari. Combine thoroughly. It will come together pretty quickly. The more you mix once it’s combined, the more you’re working the gluten, which will result in chewier sausages. You’ll get a feel for how much you want to mix the more you make these.

Divide the mixture into 6 equal parts. I usually just eyeball this, but don’t worry about being perfect; you can always break up or add to a sausage once you make one, so just do your best. (See the video for how I do it.)

Place one part of the mix onto a sheet of foil, and mold into a 6-inch log. Roll it up in the foil. Place each of the 6 sausages in a steamer, and steam for 30 minutes.

Once they’re steamed, you can store them in the refrigerator for future eating, but why would you do that? Eat now. Unwrap them, grill them up or pan-fry with a little oil. Then, stick them in a bun with all the fixings, chop them up to make sausage biscuits and gravy, or cut them up and add them to a stew. They’re absolutely delicious, and yes, your Uncle Harry will think you just fed him a sausage from a cut-up pig, so even he’ll be happy. They’re that good.

VARIATIONS

Consider this a base and vary your herbs and spices to your liking. It’s a flexible recipe waiting for your special touch. Just don’t add pigs. Thank you.

[Tweet “Check out this delicious homemade sausage recipe. Pig-free. Gluten-full. Flavor-packed.”]

Urban Livestock

With access to healthful fruits and vegetables lacking in many areas of Oakland, the city modified its zoning regulations to make it easier for people to grow and sell edible plants… For more, listen below.

Food Rainbow

As an educator around the ethics of food, my message for eating compassionately is simple: make choices that reflect your own values of compassion and kindness. When it comes to eating healthfully, my message is equally simple: eat by color… For more, listen below.

Eat Your Vegetables

Despite Mom’s standard mealtime instruction, we’re eating fewer vegetables than ever. In this radio editorial, I suggest some ways to reverse the trend.

Compassion

When Colleen Patrick-Goudreau prepares her meals, she isn’t selective in her compassion for living things.