Skip to main content

Tag: language

The Semantics of Meat (with Paul Shapiro)

Semantics play a significant role in shaping public perception about animals and animal welfare. The meat, dairy, and egg industries go to great lengths to remove harsh terminology and replace it with euphemisms that conceal the truth and sanitize violence. In today’s episode, I talk to someone who knows this all too well: Paul Shapiro, Vice President of Policy at The Humane Society of the United States. Join us as we discuss euphemisms and doublespeak used by animal agriculture and the best terms for plant-based and cultured meat. 

Supporters receive an additional conversation with Paul once the interview ended.

Animalogy Loves Your Shares!

Many of you fabulous people have asked the best way to share Animalogy Podcast on social media, so here is a page chock-full of shareables, both graphics and content for tweets and posts. NOTE: This page is continually updated as new episodes are released, so check back for more shareables.

Click on any of the graphics you want to share, then “right-mouse-click,” and save. Direct your followers to animalogypodcast.com or to  iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play to listen to Animalogy. 

[ngg_images source=”galleries” container_ids=”10″ display_type=”photocrati-nextgen_basic_thumbnails” override_thumbnail_settings=”1″ thumbnail_width=”268″ thumbnail_height=”268″ thumbnail_crop=”0″ images_per_page=”51″ number_of_columns=”0″ ajax_pagination=”0″ show_all_in_lightbox=”0″ use_imagebrowser_effect=”0″ show_slideshow_link=”1″ slideshow_link_text=”[Show slideshow]” order_by=”imagedate” order_direction=”DESC” returns=”included” maximum_entity_count=”500″] 

[Tweet “ANIMALOGY is a fascinating podcast about our animal-related words & phrases. Listen!”]

[Tweet “Animalogy is a podcast that is changing the way we talk — and think about other animals!”]

Don’t Get My Goat – I’m Not Kidding

In this episode of Animalogy, we explore the goat-related words and expressions in our everyday language — particularly those formed by the Old English words goat, buck, and kid (such as butcher, “kidding around,” and goatee). You’re going to love it. I kid you not. (Get it?)  

I Wonder What the Gods Are Thinking Now

INAUGURATION: ON A WING AND A PRAYER, the first episode of the Animalogy Podcast, is all about the word inauguration and the ancient augurs (priests) whose role it was to interpret the will of the gods by reading the habits of birds. This is the root of the English word inauguration to refer to electing politicians into office with the hope that their time in office would prove to be auspicious—or inauspicious. 

I can only guess what the birds signs would look like today. 

For your listening pleasure, I’ve pulled out the excerpts of inauguration speeches from the INAUGURATION episode of Animalogy. Listen below. (Of course you can listen to the full episode here.)

[Tweet “Listen to clips of inauguration speeches from presidents who spoke of unity.”]

READ EXCERPTS OF THESE SPEECHES:

“This is preeminently the time to speak the truth, the whole truth, frankly and boldly. Nor need we shrink from honestly facing conditions in our country today. This great Nation will endure as it has endured, will revive and will prosper. So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself—nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance.” ~President Franklin Delano Roosevelt

“Ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.” ~President John F. Kennedy

“On this occasion the oath I have taken before you and before God is not mine alone, but ours together. We are one nation and one people. Our fate as a nation and our future as a people rest not upon one citizen but upon all citizens…They came here—the exile and the stranger, brave but frightened—to find a place where a man could be his own man. They made a covenant with this land. Conceived in justice, written in liberty, bound in union, it was meant one day to inspire the hopes of all mankind. And it binds us still. If we keep its terms we shall flourish.” ~President Lyndon Johnson

“My friends, we are not the sum of our possessions. They are not the measure of our lives. In our hearts we know what matters. We cannot hope only to leave our children a bigger car, a bigger bank account. We must hope to give them a sense of what it means to be a loyal friend; a loving parent; a citizen who leaves his home, his neighborhood, and town better than he found it.” ~George H. Bush

“The divide of race has been America’s constant curse. And each new wave of immigrants gives new targets to old prejudices. Prejudice and contempt cloaked in the pretense of religious or political conviction are no different.” ~President Bill Clinton 

“We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus, and nonbelievers. We are shaped by every language and culture, drawn from every end of this Earth. And because we have tasted the bitter swill of civil war and segregation and emerged from that dark chapter stronger and more united, we cannot help but believe that the old hatreds shall someday pass; that the lines of tribe shall soon dissolve; that as the world grows smaller, our common humanity shall reveal itself; and that America must play its role in ushering in a new era of peace. To the Muslim world, we seek a new way forward, based on mutual interest and mutual respect.” ~President Barack Obama

Falconry: Fed Up and Looking Haggard

The practice of hunting wild birds with trained birds — for fun is called falconry. Though it came into its own almost 1,000 years ago in England after the Norman invasion, it continues to have a stronghold in our contemporary English language. I hope I can lure you to join me today as I share all of the words and expressions that come from this blood sport and to hear about the time *I* was roused to try my hand at falconry and why I turned tail by the end of it.

Muscle: Flex Your Mouse

Roll up your sleeve past your bicep, flex your arm at the elbow, and squeeze — or contract — your bicep muscle. Take a look at it. Now, relax it — keep looking at it, and contract again. Squeeze. And relax. What do you see? Movement, right? Do you see an animal? Well, some anatomist did when the word muscle was coined.

A Mouse in Your Muscles!

Supporters receive written transcripts of every Animalogy episode.

Eating Crow? Try Eating Humble Pie, Instead

If you’ve made a serious faux pas and need to acknowledge it with humility, you might be said to be “eating crow” or “eating humble pie,” both phrases of which involve animals — or do they? 

Supporters receive every written transcript of Animalogy episodes.

Share any and all of these graphics on social media:

 

 

Zodiac: A Circle of Animals — Literally

Of the 88 constellations officially recognized by Western astronomy, 40 of them are named after animals — 43 if you count the mythical animals. We’re going to talk about 12 of them today — the 12 that make up the zodiac from Western astrology — ALL of which contain animals. 

After all, the word zodiac is Greek for “circle of little animals.”

History of English in 10 (ish) Minutes

A Very Brief History of a Very Old Language

Throughout the episodes of Animalogy, I’ll be talking about the Proto-Indo-European reconstructed language, the related Indo-European languages, Old English (or Anglo-Saxon), the Norman invasion, Latin, Greek, and different types of sound changes that have occurred in English.

In order to provide some context for what might be unfamiliar bits of history or linguistics, I’m offering this brief overview of this remarkable language called English.

FIVE THINGS YOU CAN DO FOR ANIMALOGY: 

1.Subscribe to Animalogy on iTunes and Stitcher and download the episodes.

2. Leave a 5-star rating on iTunes. 

3. Leave a review on iTunes. High ratings, reviews, and downloads in the first month increase the chances of high placement on iTunes.

4. Become a monthly supporter of the podcast. For just .33 cents a day, you receive transcripts to each episode; for $1.00 a day, you get bonus episodes. Your support helps us reach the goal of making it a weekly, ad-free show.

5. Share the podcast with everyone you know! Use the share buttons below and above!

Thank you! For the animals,

Coccyx: Please Don’t Sit on the Cuckoo

Coccyx is a small triangle-shaped bone at the base of the spinal column in humans and other apes, such as gibbons, orangutans, gorillas, and chimpanzees.

Representing a vestigial tail and most commonly called the tailbone, coccyx was the name given to this part of our anatomy by ancient Greek physician Galen because of its resemblance to an animal, making the word an “animalogy.”

Can you guess the etymology? All is revealed in this episode of Animalogy, a podcast about language and the animal-related words and expressions we use every day.

There's an animal hiding in your tailbone! Listen to Animalogy podcast find out more. Share on X

FIVE THINGS YOU CAN DO FOR ANIMALOGY: 

1.Subscribe to Animalogy on iTunes and Stitcher and download the episodes.

2. Leave a 5-star rating on iTunes. 

3. Leave a review on iTunes. High ratings, reviews, and downloads in the first month increase the chances of high placement on iTunes.

4. Become a monthly supporter of the podcast. For just .33 cents a day, you receive transcripts to each episode; for $1.00 a day, you get bonus episodes. Your support helps us reach the goal of making it a weekly, ad-free show.

5. Share the podcast with everyone you know! Use the share buttons below and above!