Tag: plant-based

Panzanella (Bread Salad)

Reprinted with permission from The 30-Day Vegan Challenge

Instead of discarding that hearty Italian loaf that’s going stale, make this delicious bread salad that is absolutely divine in the summer when tomatoes, cucumbers, and basil are at their peak. Vegan, of course.

Ingredients

  • 5 to 6 medium tomatoes, cut into large chunks 
  • 4 to 6 cups (360 to 540 g) day-old crusty bread (Italian loaf or French baguette), cut into cubes the same size as the tomatoes (a full loaf or baguette should be fine)
  • 1 medium hothouse cucumber, unpeeled, seeded, and coarsely chopped
  • ½ small red onion, finely chopped
  • 2 to 3 medium cloves garlic, minced 
  • 3 tablespoons capers, drained
  • 20 large basil leaves, coarsely chopped
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons high-quality balsamic or red wine vinegar
  • ¼ cup (60 ml) high-quality extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Directions

Add the tomatoes, bread, cucumber, red onion, garlic, capers, and basil to a large bowl, and toss together. Drizzle in the vinegar and ¼ cup olive oil, and toss some more. Add salt and pepper to taste, and add additional olive oil, if desired. 

Set aside and marinate, covered, at room temperature for at least 30 minutes, up to 12 hours. I would avoid marinating the salad in the refrigerator, since the tomatoes tend to become somewhat “mealy” in the fridge. 

Serve at room temperature. 

Yield: 8 generous servings as a side 

For Your Edification

Panzanella is an Italian salad (pan means “bread”) that was most likely invented out of necessity as a way to use stale bread, along with fresh vegetables from the garden. The earliest written reference to Panzanella is from the 1500s in a poem by the famous artist, Bronzino. Because the tomato hadn’t yet been introduced to Italy, the original recipe wouldn’t have included tomatoes. 

For Your Information

If you don’t have stale bread, take a fresh loaf of hearty bread, cut it into large cubes, spread them on a baking sheet, and bake in a 200°F-degree oven for about 10 to 15 minutes. You don’t want to completely toast the bread; you just want to dry it out. It’s essential that you dry out the bread first before soaking it in the oil and vinegar; otherwise, it will just become soggy.

For Your Modification

Add other ingredients that pair well with the traditional classic, such as olives, sundried tomatoes, capers, red wine, parsley, mint, roasted bell peppers.

Soy-free

Any questions?

Vegan Breakfast and Brunch Recipes

We had a fabulous time in our Breakfast & Brunch Class, and I’m still reaping the rewards (READ: eating the leftovers)! The On-Demand Class is now available for you to enjoy the video and recipes! 

Thank you for supporting a small vegan business. xo

PURCHASE THE ON-DEMAND BREAKFAST RECIPES + VIDEO

  • Fluffy Pancakes
  • Maple Tempeh Bacon
  • Strawberries ‘n Custard Parfait

…plus I shared David’s recipe and secrets for making a STRAWBERRY SIMPLE SYRUP to add to sparkling wine or sparkly soda. GET YOUR RECIPES TODAY!  

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____________________

See listing for my online cooking classes here!

For more on living and cooking vegan (i.e. compassionately and healthfully), my books are here to help:

The Joy of Vegan Baking 

The Vegan Table

Color Me Vegan

Vegan’s Daily Companion

The 30-Day Vegan Challenge

The Joyful Vegan

Plant-Based Food Rituals for the New Year

In this New Year’s episode, we celebrate the 15th year of Food for Thought podcast with some plant-based food rituals from around the world to bring in the new year.  

As always, you can find lots of resources for living compassionately and healthfully at joyfulvegan.com, you can find my books wherever books are sold, and you can join me in my online cooking classes. And because of you, this podcast is 100% listener-supported. You can join other supporters by going to patreon.com/colleenpatrickgoudreau. 

For the animals, thank you for subscribing and listening. 

Apricot Red Lentil Soup (Vegan Recipe)

This is one of my go-to soups whenever I want something quick and delicious. It’s also a perfect New Year’s dish, as the lentils represent prosperity and luck in the coming year.  If the apricots seem weird to you in a soup, trust me! They add a touch of sweetness and cook down into melt-in-your-mouth goodness. 

Ingredients

2 tablespoons oil or water, for sautéing
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup halved dried apricots
1-1/2 cups red lentils, picked through and rinsed
5 cups vegetable stock
3 Roma (plum) tomatoes, seeded and chopped
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1 -15-ounce can chickpeas (garbanzo beans), rinsed and drained 

Directions

Heat up the oil or water in a large soup pot. Add the onion, garlic, and apricots, and cook for about 7 minutes over medium heat, until the onions begin to turn translucent. Stir occasionally to prevent sticking. 

Add the lentils and stock. Cover, bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes.

Stir in the tomatoes, cumin, thyme, and salt and pepper to taste. Simmer for 10 minutes.

Puree 1/2 of the stew in a blender or food processor (or using a stick/immersion blender), then return to the pot. Add the chickpeas, cooking until they’re heated through, about 5 minutes. Serve hot. 

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

RELATED POSTS

https://www.colleenpatrickgoudreau.com/classes/healthy-hearty-soups-live-online-vegan-cooking-class/

https://www.colleenpatrickgoudreau.com/classes/pressure-cooker-hearty-meals-live-online-vegan-cooking-class/

Summertime Online Vegan Cooking Classes

Tools for Making Homemade Pizza

Here are some of the tools I use for making pizza at home. 

PIZZA STONE

Technically speaking, you CAN make pizza without a stone, but you will get the most authentic homemade pizza with a stone because of the heat it absorbs and generates. There are many out there, but here is one I like a lot by Pizzacraft. I really like the size — it’s 16.5″ round, though you can use rectangular as well.


PIZZA PEEL

First and foremost you need a pizza peel. This is what you build your pizza on and use to slide it in and out of the oven. For years, I used only a wooden one, but now I use both wooden and metal. The raw pizza dough sticks less to wood than to metal (even with the cornmeal on it), so I prefer the wood for building the initial pizza on. However, the metal is just so much easier to slide underneath the pizza once it’s cooking on the stone — in order to turn the pizza as well as to pull it out of the oven. You’d be fine just using the wood for everything, but I thought you might like to know my technique. 

IMPORTANT: Do NOT cut your pizza on the peel! Once you slide it out of the oven using the peel, transfer it to a large cutting board for cutting!

Metal Pizza Peel. My 1st choice is Pomodoro and the one I have (I like that the handle folds in for easier storage), but there are lots out there. Another choice would be 

Wood / Bamboo Pizza Peel. I like this Fiery Chef Bamboo Peel for the same reason as the Pomodoro metal one above. The handle folds in making it easy to store. However, if that’s not an issue for you, I do tend to like having one solid piece as a peel, such as this New Star peel. It just feels sturdier and more stable. 


PIZZA CUTTER

Whereas you can use a knife for cutting into thicker Sicilian-style pizzas or focaccia, you’ll be very happy using a proper pizza cutter wheel for Neapolitan-style. As above, I prefer all metal


BOWL SCRAPER

Perhaps not essential for you, but I like being able to use the scraper to get the dough out of the bowl (the dough scraper above is a little too big for that, and this bowl scraper is a little too small to manage the dough on the countertop). So…here’s a bowl scraper I would recommend. 


KITCHEN SCALE

Those of us in North American tend to measure rather than weigh our dry ingredients, but weighing is SOO much more accurate. In my recipes, I will always provide measurements in cups, but I really like being able to talk about weight in ounces, as well, especially when it comes to separating out the pizza dough / balls. So, do consider getting a kitchen scale. It will change baking for you. Here’s one I’ve had for years.  

…and of course, a pizza class! (Join my virtual cooking classes for fabulous recipes and a fun, inspiring, energetic hour!)

 

 

10 Favorite Countertop Appliances

It’s true that small appliances require some space, but it’s also true that they can make it easy to prepare and eat delicious, nutrient-dense, and cruelty-free vegan, plant-based dishes. While you can get along without them, I do think a couple are worth the space they take up on your counter, and their price points are really reasonable. 

I also recommend — if you can / if you have space — keeping those you use often (like the air fryer and blender) out on your counter. If you have to dig around a closet every time you want to use them, you never will.

If we don’t have time to be sick, we have to make time to be healthy.

NOTE: This blog post also corresponds with a podcast episode I did by the same name, but also include LESSONS FROM A KITCHEN REMODEL. Listen and learn more here.

In no particular order, here are my favorites and why. (Disclosure: while no one pays me to make these recommendations, if you purchase them through the links provided, I make a small commission.)

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  1. Air Fryer: Circulating air up, down, and all around, an air fryer is essentially a compact convection. I had the space to add this appliance, but if you are choosing between a small convection oven (toaster oven size) and an air fryer, you’d be better off choosing the convection oven. Having said that, I love my air fryer and use it every day, the main benefit of which is not having to preheat it before using. While it’s a great way to cook without oil, I still find that a little oil adds moisture and flavor to my veggies that are too dry without it. But you just need so little! Favorite things to cook in my air fryer: 
  • Brassicas: cauliflower, broccoli, broccolini, Brussels sprouts. Just a small amount of oil rubbed on each floret, tossed with a sprinkling of salt is all you need for crispy bites in 10 minutes.
  • Carrot fries: Cut carrots into matchsticks, toss with a little olive oil, salt, and chili powder. 
  • Kale chips: Seriously, in just a few minutes (and on a lower heat), you will have the most glorious, nutrient-dense kale chips. Again, a little oil rubbed onto each leaf, plus salt, AND golden flakes (aka nooch; aka nutritional yeast). 
  • Japanese sweet potatoes: Bake them first and store in fridge. When it’s time for dinner, split them open on the top and smash down the flesh with a fork OR I just slice the potatoes up into discs — and put in the air fryer for about 10 minutes. No oil. Crispy on the outside and creamy on the inside. 

Top choice: Ninja Air Fryer (4 quart) – perfect size and fits on counter nicely. Only issue is that I often have to cook in separate batches. If you want a larger size, I recommend my 2nd choice. 

2nd choice: Ninja Air Fryer (5.5 quart) – If you have the space, go for this “family size” air fryer. You can cook a lot at once, and it comes in lots of fun, pretty colors. 

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2. Pressure Cooker: Game-changer in no uncertain terms. It is not an exaggeration to say that getting a pressure changed everything for me. Beans (without soaking!) are ready in 30 minutes and taste better than any bean in a can or even cooked on the stove for hours. The pressure just seals in the flavor and makes the world taste good. 

Top choice: Instant Pot (8 quarts) I’ve had others. This is the best.

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3. Blender: A blender is best for liquefying or blending liquid ingredients. Because the blade is all the way at the bottom, it doesn’t do as good a job as a food processor. However, I use my blender to make smoothies, shakes, and nice cream on a regular basis, which the food processor isn’t meant for.

Top choice: Vitamix. Nothing beats this blender and its tamper. Period. Full stop. 

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4. Food Processor: As I mention below, I love my Kitchen Aid food processor because it has a large bowl with a large blade and a small bowl and blade that fits into it. I LOVE the versatility of that. I use my food processor for quickly chopping onions, carrots, and garlic; for pureeing soups; for making peanut butter; for pulsing chickpeas for Better-Than-Tuna…just name it. The only thing I don’t use it for is blending (like for making smoothies and nice cream). 

Top choice: Kitchen Aid 11-cup. I have had this machine for almost 20 years and haven’t had to replace any parts — ever. That’s the first reason I recommend the Kitchen Aid brand; the second is because one machine has two bowls and two blades – large and small – a convenient feature that not all food processors have. 

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5. Soy Milk Maker: While you can make soy milk without a machine, it’s INFINITELY easier to do so with a soy milk maker. 

Top choice: Joyoung Soy Milk Maker. I’ve come around to having the milk made in the stainless steel pitcher and then just straining at the end. It’s super easy to do, and you won’t have to worry about the holes in a strainer cup getting clogged. This one also enables you to make milk with unsoaked beans, but you’ll get more milk with soaked soy beans. 

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6. Countertop Toaster / Convection Oven: Before we renovated our kitchen (someday I’ll share before and after photos), we didn’t have space for a toaster oven, and I really really missed having one. Not a TOASTER, mind you — a toaster OVEN. Basically a small convection oven. I don’t like using my large wall ovens unless I have to; they use a ton of electricity, and the fan is loud. So, I use our countertop convection oven for everything from baking Japanese sweet potatoes and drop biscuits to toasting ciabatta!

Top choice: Oster Toaster Oven. Digital, easy to use, lots of options and settings. No complaints.

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7. Popcorn Air Popper: I don’t hide the fact that I eat popcorn several times a week, and while I grew up on Jiffy Pop, there comes a time you grow out of your childhood habits. I have had an air popper for 25 years and while it looks a little worse or wear, it’s perfect in my eyes. 

Top choice: Presto Air Popper. My original air popper is so old (25 years?) that I can’t find it anymore, but this one has the same features I love!

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8. Electric Stand Mixer: A stand mixer is essentially the same as a hand mixer but with more powerful motors than their hand-held counterparts. I’ve had my machine for at least 20 years — also a KitchenAid — and while I technically could live without it, I use it frequently: for kneading bread dough, for whipping up aquafaba for “egg whites,” and for making quick, large batches of cookie dough. Most stand mixers come with a variety of various additional blades, whisks, and hooks.

Top choice: Kitchen Aid Stand Mixer

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9. Juicer: We’re probably getting to the “nice-to-have’s” at this point, but I have to include a few other countertop appliances, including my juicer. I juice at least once a week. My favorite combination is carrots, ginger, and apples. My juicer is decades old, so I can’t recommend it — literally. It doesn’t exist anymore. I do know, though, that you’ll want to choose between centrifugal juicers and masticating. 

Centrifugal juicers have one blade and works a lot like a blender. Masticating juicers, which I have, make use of an augur instead of a blade and grind food instead of slicing it. In short, centrifugal juicers tend to create much more food waste than masticating juicers and are not able to break food down as well as masticating juicers. Personally, I would recommend a masticating juicer, which have also been called slow juicers — mostly because the slower process is believed to preserve nutrients better than high speed juicers that generate heat. And also because it requires a little more prep (quartering an apple, for example, rather than shoving an entire apple into the shoot). I’ve never found that to be an issue.

I started researching masticating juicers, but because there are so many to choose from, I think it’s just easier if you pick your own.

—————

10. An electric kettle:  This is one of those small appliances you don’t think is necessary until you have one, and then you realize you use it all the time! It’s more energy-efficient than boiling water on the stove, and 10 times as fast. If you drink a fair amount of tea, it’s a game-changer. What I love about both of these is that you can change the temperature depending on what type of tea you’re drinking: green, oolong, white or black.

Top choice: Miroco Temperature Controlled Electric Kettle 

2nd Choice: Breville Variable-Temperature Kettle

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NICE-TO-HAVE’S BUT NOT ESSENTIAL

NEXT, I wanted to include countertop “appliances” that may not be essential, but I’m happy I have them, and I definitely use them. I’m walking the line between “appliances” and “tools” here, but I make the rules, so it’s okay if I break them. 

  • Coffee Grinder (for grinding flax seeds): I’ve never had a cup of coffee in my life, but I use this handy-dandy gadget on a regular basis for grinding up the small, nutritious flax seeds that are good for eating and using as “eggs” in baking. (see blog post) 

Top choice: Krups is a good, reliable brand.

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  • Panini Press: Wonderful for making hot panini and even pancakes.

Top Choice: Breville is my recommended brand. 

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  • Electric Handheld Mixer: As the name implies, this is a hand-held device, where two stainless steel beaters are immersed in the food (in a mixing bowl) to do the mixing. 

Top choice: Dash has lots of great reviews and really pretty colors. 

2nd choice: Kitchenaid  – there are also versions that have a detachable whisk. I really like this stick blender — and those like it — where you twist to separate the body so all you have to do is put the blade part in the sink to wash it — and not the whole thing that’s attached to the plug.

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  • Immersion Blender also called Stick Blender: This is great for when you want to puree a pot of soup (or a portion of the soup) and don’t want to take out your entire blender or food processor. The one I link to below also has a whisk attachment, which is convenient, but there are many to choose from.

Top choice: Kitchen Aid Stick Blender

  • Waffle maker: This one was pretty close to making it an essential appliance, but in the end…are waffles really essential? I dunno…maybe they are. You might want to consider this #11 in my essential countertop appliances. 😉 I searched high and low for the right one, and I love the one I landed on. I did a ton of research for this, and it paid off. I love the one I got — it’s super easy, makes perfect waffles every time, and it’s a pancake maker as well! (It comes with pancake plates you can easily replace the waffle plates with!) 

Top choice: Cuisinart Waffle Maker with Pancake Plates

  • Wine fridge: Because we are wine drinkers, and we are members of a few different wineries, it’s nice to have red, rose, and white wines chilled at exactly the right drinking temperature, we did buy a wine fridge for our pantry but definitely a luxury and not a necessity. We were close to getting it built in when we re-did the kitchen, but I’m glad we didn’t. We did a ton of research for this one, as well, and it suits us perfectly — exactly the size we need and sits on top of our counter in the kitchen (and my soy milk maker sits on top). 

Top choice: Ivation 

  • Portable butane burners: So, I’ve had these for DECADES because it made teaching my cooking classes sooo easy in that I didn’t have to rely on the space I was renting to have a stove top, so I bought these little burners, and I’ve used them on picnics and sometimes even in our own back garden. It’s a bit of a hike from our kitchen to one of the outdoor spots we entertain, so I’ve brought the burners up there to make crepes or tortillas — things I wanted to serve hot when we were all outside, so in that way they’re very convenient. Now, there are definitely electric burners you can get, but I just prefer cooking over an open flame, so that’s why I gave these, and it also means you don’t need an outlet to use them! You just get little canisters of butane, and that’s what they run on. Now that I’m teaching the online cooking classes, it’s been super helpful to have my set-up such that I can point the camera down to my counter / cooking space. Otherwise, it would be awkward to constantly tilt the camera toward my stovetop. So, yeah, the little portable burner is great and a nice to have!  

Top choice: Burton Butane Burner – I’ve had 3 for years; you just have to buy the cartridges separately.

2nd choice: Coleman Butane Burner — I haven’t used it, but it looks very similar, it’s a lower price point, and it’s a good brand.


* Remember to listen to my podcast of the same name that also includes lessons from our kitchen remodel. *

For more on living and cooking vegan, my books are here to help:

The Joy of Vegan Baking 

The Vegan Table

Color Me Vegan

Vegan’s Daily Companion

The 30-Day Vegan Challenge

The Joyful Vegan

Homemade, Vegan, and Zero Waste Online Cooking Class

Watch, eat, or cook along with me — cookbook author, cooking instructor, and joyful vegan — Colleen Patrick-Goudreau as I show you how to create the most delicious, nutritious, plant-based recipes from scratch!
 

Register today to learn to make:

  • Homemade Plant-Based Milks (soy and almond)
  • Homemade Tortillas (flour and corn)
  • Homemade Seitan (juicy and delicious)

*recipes are subject to change due to availability of ingredients

The classes are fun, interactive, and live in real-time! This means, I will see you, you will see all the other participants, and you will see me cooking in my kitchen and answering your questions. In addition:

  • With my multi-camera set-up, you can watch the class with a split screen: me talking on one side and the food demonstration on the other
  • You receive all the recipes in advance of the class
  • You receive access to our private Facebook group to interact with each other before and after class
  • You receive a recording of our class within 24 hours of the end of the class

(Patreon supporters receive 10% off; check your Patreon account for your discount code.)

ONCE YOU REGISTER:

  • You will receive a confirmation page and an email containing directions for linking to the class through Zoom, our recipe packet, plus guidelines for having the best virtual experience possible!
  • If you cook along with me, just have everything prepped in advance!

https://www.colleenpatrickgoudreau.com/irish-soda-bread-vegan-recipe/

Minestrone Soup with Kale {Recipe}

 

Homemade Plant-Based Milks

Plant-based milks were the original disruptor to the dairy industry until coronavirus came along, knocking cow’s milk off its already shaky legs. As dairy operations are dumping milk and consumers are finding empty supermarket shelves, people are cooking from scratch more than ever. While commercial plant milks are faring well during this pandemic, making plant milks at home is even more economical and sustainable, and the basic ingredients may already be in your cupboards.

They cost less, have less (or no) packaging, and can be flavored or sweetened to suit your taste. Zero-waste and plastic-free. It’s a win-win!

Different types of milk vary in terms of taste and texture, so if you don’t like one, try another. All plant-based milks are interchangeable for drinking, baking, or adding to coffee/tea, though some are creamier than others. Oat, almond, cashew, and soy are the creamiest, with rice milk being the thinnest.

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ALMOND OR CASHEW MILK
Used widely in the Middle Ages in regions stretching from the Iberian Peninsula to East Asia, almond milk has long been valued for its ability to keep better than animal’s milk, which has a short shelf life. The same process for almond milk can be used for other nuts, such as cashews and hazelnuts.

Ingredients

1½ cups raw (not roasted) almonds or cashews
4 cups cold water (use less water for thicker, creamier milk)
Pinch of salt (optional, but it enhances the flavor)
Optional ingredients such as vanilla extract, cocoa powder, dates, maple syrup, agave, etc. 

Directions

Soak the almonds in water for a minimum of an hour or up to 24 hours. Soaking is optional for cashews, though they will yield more milk if you soak them for at least 30 minutes in hot water.

After soaking the nuts, discard the water. Add the almonds or cashews and the 4 cups of water to a blender. Add other ingredients such as vanilla extract or cocoa powder, if desired, and blend well on high speed. Optionally, you can sweeten the milk with your favorite sweetener (dates, sugar, maple syrup, agave, etc.).

If making almond milk, you’ll want to strain the mixture with a cheesecloth, nut milk bag, or fine sieve/strainer over a large bowl. This isn’t really necessary with cashews. 

Refrigerate for up to 5 days in an airtight container. Give a little shake before serving. 

Yield: 4 cups

[envira-gallery id="9227"]

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OAT MILK
Rolled, quick-cooking, even steel-cut will work. Oat milk can become gummy (which is why it’s so effective at combating high cholesterol), so be sure to use cold water and avoid over-blending.

Ingredients
1 cup oats
4 cups cold water (use less water for thicker, creamier milk)
Pinch of salt (optional, but it enhances the flavor)
Optional ingredients such as vanilla extract, cocoa powder, dates, maple syrup, agave, etc. 

Directions

Soak the oats in water for at least 30 minutes or overnight. After soaking, drain the water from the oats, and rinse well with cold water. 

Add fresh cold water and oats to a blender, and blend just until smooth. As with the nut milks, you can add liquid or dry sweeteners or other flavors at this time, but be careful not to over-blend the oats.

Strain the milk using a cheesecloth, nut milk bag, or sieve/strainer over a bowl. Refrigerate for up to 5 days in an airtight container. 

Yield: 4 cups

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RICE MILK
By now, you’re getting the idea that you just need grain/nut/seed/bean + water to make delicious, nutritious milks. 

Ingredients

3/4 cup uncooked long grain brown or white rice
4 cups water (use less water for thicker, creamier milk)
Pinch of salt (optional, but it enhances the flavor)

Optional ingredients such as vanilla extract, cocoa powder, dates, maple syrup, agave, etc. 

Directions

Soak rice in 2 cups very hot (not boiling water) for 2 hours. The rice should be soft at the end of 2 hours. Drain and add to a blender. 

Add the 4 cups of water, salt, and any additional ingredients. Blend well. Taste for sweetness and adjust accordingly. Strain using a cheesecloth, nut milk bag, or sieve/strainer. 

Yield: 4 cups

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SOY MILK
Possibly the oldest of the bunch is soy milk, which originated in China thousands of years ago and was used long before we have written records to document the precise “day of discovery.” You can certainly make soy milk without a machine, but it is oodles easier to invest in a simple soy milk maker. (Here’s my favorite.) You’ll make back your investment in no time with the amount of delicious, nutty milk you will make. 

Though water is really the only beverage we have a physiological need for (beyond our own human milk when we’re young), it is certainly convenient and tasty to be able to make creamy, nutrient-rich milk from nuts, grains, legumes, and seeds. No packaging, no additives, no pregnant cow required. It’s a win-win during times of crisis or anytime. 

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PLANT MILK? LEAVE YOUR COMMENTS BELOW!

 

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Colleen Patrick-Goudreau is an author whose topics include animal agriculture, animal protection, and plant-based eating. She has written seven books, including several cookbooks, is a regular contributor to National Public Radio and LiveKindly, and has published letters and commentaries in The New York Times, The Economist, and The Christian Science Monitor. 

*Photos by Marie Laforêt

?‍? BRUNCH COOK ALONG WITH THE JOYFUL VEGAN! ?‍?

 

Make a brunch date to watch, eat, or cook along with me, Colleen Patrick-Goudreau — cookbook author, joyful vegan, compassionate cook —  in this online cooking class as I demonstrate how to create some easy, delicious, nutritious, plant-based recipes for breakfast or brunch.

On our breakfast-brunch-themed menu*:

  • Polenta Scramble
  • French Toast
  • Coconut Bacon
  • Mystery Brunch Cocktail (with special guest)

WHEN: Sunday, April 19th 12-1 p.m. PST
WHERE: From wherever you are!
HOW: Upon registering, all participants receive an email containing directions for linking to the class through Zoom, along with the recipes and instructions for having the most enjoyable experience. If you want to cook along with me, just have everything prepped by the start of the class! 

*recipes are subject to change due to availability of ingredients

Register today! And remember: patreon supporters receive 10% off; check your Patreon account for your discount code.)

*A PORTION OF THE PROCEEDS FROM THIS CLASS WILL BE DONATED TO: PALS East Bay, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to help pets and the people who love them. They run monthly FREE vaccine clinics and provide medical/vaccine outreach and spay/neuter referral assistance to underserved and unsheltered communities — especially helpful now during the Covid-19 pandemic.

THANKS FOR HELPING SPREAD THE WORD!

? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ????️??????????

Photos from previous classes (last photo from Tina Atwell, who has joined every class and cooks along!)

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