Skip to main content

Tag: plantbased

20 Years Vegan!

This year, I’m celebrating 20 years being vegan, and to celebrate, I’m publishing my 7th book: The Joyful Vegan: How to Stay Vegan in a World That Wants You to Eat Meat, Dairy, and Eggs. It comes out in November 2019 and is available for preorder!

People who support me at $20/month and above have received special recognition in the book, and I want to thank them here. I’m so grateful to the special individuals below who generously support my work as monthly patrons. On behalf of the animals, thank you for helping me help people manifest their values of compassion and wellness in their everyday lives.

 Alexander Gray and David Cabrera

Anke Keilich

Ann Merrill

Bailey Manlosa

Becky Peters

Belen Melendrez

Boni Lamson

Brece Clark

Brooke Bussard

Brooke Hueper

Caroline Dyar

Cheri Brown

Cini Bretzlaff-Holstein

Cristina Fisher

Debra Knutson

Delfina Lopez

Geneviève Okuma

Gina Carr

Heather Elise Goodwin

Janet Ratliff

Janette Gilmour

Jayson Biggins

Jennifer Guerra

Jennifer Watkins

Jerilynn Hilmar

Johanna Veth

Jonathan Brant

Joseph Sailor

Kari Parker

Katariina Forsberg

Kenda English

Korshi Dosoo and Davide Galli

Kristin Beecraft

Laura Lichterman

Leana Lovejoy

Liv Larsen

Liz Dee

Lydia Ruth Huston

Lyndall Sargent

Marie-Eve Bedard

Matthew and Nina King

Max Goodman

Megan Lindeman

Melissa Amarello

Michael Rooney

Michal Stone

Michelle Mabe

Mike McNeeley

Morgan Hall

Nikki DeSarno

Nina Bircher

  1. J. Schuster

Paul Zhang

Patricia Hagmann

Patrick Reilly

Ranjini Mohan

Rassmus Peterson

Roland Reid

Rosalie Black

Sandy Kraus Smith

Sara Dee

Sheri Mersola

Sue Ellis Dyar

Susan Kiger

Tammy Robertson

Thomas J Baechle

Tim Anderson

Tina Strasheim

Todd Hilson

How to Stop Being Vegan!

Got your attention, didn’t I? Put it this way: the majority of people who become vegan stop being vegan, and I want to end that. HENCE, my new book, The Joyful Vegan: How to Stay Vegan in a World That Wants You to Eat Meat, Dairy, and Eggs. It comes out in November, but it’s available for pre-order TODAY!

As a 20-year vegan and long-time animal advocate and after hearing from thousands of people who’ve become vegan, stopped being vegan, or struggled with staying vegan, I’ve come to identify common threads within all of these stories—threads that provide insight into why some people stay vegan and others don’t. SPOILER: it’s not because there’s nothing to eat. It’s not because of lack of protein.

In fact, I believe that the food is the easy part of being vegan. What is most challenging is dealing with the social, cultural, and emotional aspects:

  • being asked to defend your eating choices
  • living with the awareness of animal suffering
  • feeling the pressure (often self-inflicted) to be perfect
  • not being part of a like-minded community
  • experiencing guilt, remorse, and anger
  • …and so much more

In The Joyful Vegan, I share what I’ve learned about navigating and overcoming these challenges and arm readers with solutions and strategies for staying confident with family and friends, creating healthy relationships, communicating effectively, sharing enthusiasm without evangelizing, finding a community of people who share your values, and experiencing peace of mind as a vegan in a non-vegan world.

By implementing the tools provided in this book, you will find you can live ethically, eat healthfully, engage socially—and remain a joyful vegan.

Please let me know below what your challenges are! I want to make sure I’ve covered everything in the book. In the meantime, while the book will be available everywhere books are sold, it’s currently available at Amazon.com and other book vendors!

P.S. You might want to look at my Events page to see if I’m speaking in a city near you while on my book tour!

The Vegan Police: How to Speak Up for Animals without Talking Down to People

A small subset of opinionated, passionate, well-intentioned people perpetuate the stereotype of the angry, self-righteous, perfection-focused animal rights vegan when they spew invective at anyone who is not “vegan enough” in their eyes. They are otherwise known as The Vegan Police.

Of course I’m very well aware of how judgmental people can be — we’re all guilty of it — and nothing tastes better than sweet self-righteousness, especially when it exists in the name of justice. But self-righteousness,  arrogance, and meanness are just ugly regardless of what inspires them. And of course I’ve been keenly aware of the existence of the perfectionist vegan for as long as I’ve been vegan — probably since before I was vegan.

But I’ve been seeing it so much more invective on social media – not much of it directly because I won’t venture into territory that is filled with self-righteousness and piety and name-calling.  But I’m hearing about it a lot more because my audience comes to me and tells me what they see and hear, and frankly…forgive my naivete,  I find it shocking. I’m shocked at the things people say and how they say them. These comments are filled with so much scorn and unkindness, and I have to believe that the people writing it aren’t aware of how toxic it is for everyone — including for the animals.

As I see it, this toxic self-righteousness is coming from two groups — and this is a broad generalization, but there seems to be:

  1. some well-intentioned ethical vegans who are concerned that veganism as an ethical way of living is watered down by the media and celebrities who position veganism as a temporary, trendy diet. Hooked on the ideology, the badge, the label, the purity, this is the group that acts as if veganism is the end rather than the means to an end. 
  2. some well-intentioned health-oriented plant-based eaters who excoriate the consumption of oil, sugar, flour, wheat, gluten, or soy.  This is the group of dietary purity that scorns anyone as a “junk food vegan” who doesn’t fit their prescribed notion of what vegans should eat (and look) like. 

I bring up both of these groups because I see policing on both sides. It’s really more than acting like the police; it’s also playing judge, jury, and executioner. Today, I’m going to talk only about the first category and save the second for an upcoming podcast episode.

In the first category, those folks attack:

  • Vegetarians who are not yet vegan.
  • People who identify as vegan but who “cheat” or eat animal products occasionally.
  • People who identify as vegan but who have stopped eating animals and animal products for health reasons. The feeling is that if they’re not doing it for the animals, then they shouldn’t call themselves vegan.
  • People who don’t identify as vegan but who have stopped eating animals and animal products for health reasons and thus call themselves “plant-based.” The feeling is that if they’re just “plant-based,” then it’s not about the animals and they’ll still be contributing to animal exploitation.
  • Non-vegans (including celebrities) who have vegan companies or sell vegan products. (Even though many of us live in the real world where we buy vegan products from non-vegan grocery stores and plants harvested by non-vegan farmers and eat in vegan restaurants owned by non-vegans, when a non-vegan celebrity (ahem, Beyonce) announced that she’s creating a vegan food delivery service, the Interwebs went nuts — accusing her of appropriating the vegan ethic.)

But it’s not just the non-vegans who are targets of their scorn. It’s also vegans — it’s vegans who are pregnant or who have children (“breeders”). Vegans who have companion animals (“perpetuating animal slavery”). Vegans who are religious. Vegans who celebrate Christmas. Vegans who celebrate Valentine’s Day. Vegans who aren’t intersectionalists. Vegans who aren’t activists. Vegans who share recipes. Vegans who aren’t angry all the time. Vegans who aren’t Level-5 vegans.

In a famous Simpson’s episode called “Lisa the Tree Hugger,” Lisa meets animal/enviornmental rights activist, Jesse. She falls head over heels in love and wants him to notice how conscious and ethical she is.  

Lisa: Oh, the earth is the best! That’s why I’m a vegetarian.
Jesse: Heh. Well, that’s a start.
Lisa: Uh, well, I was thinking of going vegan.
Jesse: I’m a level 5 vegan — I won’t eat anything that casts a shadow.

Ah, yes. It’s funny because it’s so true.

Now, don’t get me wrong: I love people who have opinions. I’m one of them. I love people who stand up for what they believe in. I’m one of them. I love people who speak up for the animals and act on their behalf. I’m one of them. But we can do all of that without being cruel. I feel like I’m constantly talking about walking the line between this and that: walking the line between speaking up for what we believe in and not being attached to the outcome. Walking the line between asking for what we want without being demanding. Walking the line between expressing our opinion without attacking other people. We can do it all. We can. It takes practice, and it takes time, but it can be done.

I think we humans — especially opinionated or justice-oriented humans — are not good at living in the grey areas or at least areas we feel are places of contradiction. For instance, I think what happens for so many animal rights activists and ethical vegans is that we feel so acutely aware of how much animals are suffering that we think if we don’t demonstrate outrage about this fact all the time, then we’re not being true to them. We’re not being good advocates. I think we think that if we’re not in a constant state of anger about how animals are treated, we’re letting the animals down. We feel that if we don’t speak UP for animals, we’re letting them down, but speaking up for the non-human animals doesn’t mean we have to speak down to the human animals. 

I understand the urgency. I understand the desperation, the outrage, the anger. It’s why I talk about this in the podcast series I did called The 10 Stages You Go Through When You Stop Eating Animals (and it’s the subject of my upcoming book The Joyful Vegan’s Guide to Life). It’s not that we shouldn’t be outraged and motivated and angry, but I think some people lose the plot. Or maybe they haven’t lost the plot at all. Maybe the problem is they see nothing but the plot, but that’s a problem because when you see only one thing through one lens, you become incredibly myopic. Animals are victims of horrific violence at our hands for the sake of our pleasure and convenience. That is true. That is real. But that’s not all that’s real. That’s not all that’s true. As human beings, we don’t live in a vacuum.

We are complex people who live in a complex world with many, many inputs determining who we become and what we do and what we believe and what we buy and who we eat. Forces are in play every day conditioning us, reinforcing belief systems, influencing our decisions, and affecting our relationships.

It’s neither realistic nor fair to expect everyone to see through the same lens we do. And as advocates, we want to speak up and help guide people toward embracing their empathy and compassion for animals and not contribute to this violence. In fact, the word “advocate” is built from the word “vocare” – to call – which is related to the word “vox” – voice. As advocates we MUST use our voices in order to be voices for animals, but we have to be mindful of HOW to use our voice so that we’re not only compassionate but effective. We must speak up, but we don’t have to be cretins to do so. 

I will emphasize the word “effective” for those who don’t think they have to be compassionate to people when the stakes (for animals) are so high, but I will tell you that if you think people will be attracted to venom and invective, then I will just say I vehemently disagree.

People join groups and befriend people they’re attracted to, and I guarantee you that very few people are attracted to self-righteousness, especially when something is new to them and they’re already feeling vulnerable and exploring unfamiliar territory. And when the attack comes publicly, that’s even worse, because nobody likes being humiliated. That should just go without saying, but I’ve said it, and I’ll say it again. Nobody likes being humiliated.

I’m not saying everyone has to agree or have the same viewpoints. But that doesn’t mean in disagreeing or having conviction or having opinions we can’t do it in a way that is constructive rather than destructive.

Of course, you can say that in the end, the person who happens upon a negative comment and chooses not to be vegan because of it is really their own blocks and they’re just using it as an excuse to not change their behavior. But I don’t think it’s as simple as that. Yes, I believe very much that we’re ultimately responsible for our own actions, but we’re also social creatures and psychological creatures, and some things really are just a turn-off for people, and if you don’t know that you have an effect on people for better or for worse, then you’re just lying to yourself.

You’re lying because if you’re any kind of activist, you’re ACTING to affect someone else’s behavior, so you’re at least aware that there’s a relationship taking place, that there’s a cause and effect. And what I’m saying is that mean, nasty, self-righteous posts mostly have the EFFECT of turning people away.

Now, in the end, my little lecture isn’t going to change much. It will probably receive approval from those who already agree with me and scorn from those who don’t. In the end, I can’t control how others represent veganism and animal advocacy. And that’s part of the point. We can’t control how people — the media, celebrities, the public, vegans, plant-based eaters, etc. —  will use or represent what “vegan” is!

We can’t control the message, because there is no single voice. My voice is singular; it’s my own, and I use it. Your voice is singular; it’s your own. Use it wisely and intelligently and effectively. How I represent myself as a vegan and animal activist is all I can control, and in being able to control that, I’m going to be the best, most steadfast, most compassionate, most effective voice for animals I can be. 

“Vegan” isn’t a trademark that any of us own. It’s a means for achieving my goal of living in a way that doesn’t contribute to violence against animals. We can help clarify what vegan means, because it does mean something, but we don’t get vegan certification when we become vegan. Being vegan is not about being perfect or pure, and I think this expectation of perfection is what stops many people from even trying to be vegan.

Their fear is justified when they proudly declare to someone or in a message board that they’ve become vegan, and they’re met with smug responses from non-vegans that the shoes they’re wearing are made of are leather or from vegans that the machines on which their peanut butter was made were also used to make non-vegan food products.

That isn’t to say that in this imperfect world I don’t accidentally contribute to the suffering of human or non-human animals, but that doesn’t make me less vegan. It just makes me human: an imperfect human in an imperfect world using this thing called VEGAN as a pretty fantastic way to reflect my values of compassion and wellness.

And that’s the message I want to convey when people are trying to do the right thing. I want them to know that there’s so much they can do in their own lives to not contribute to violence against animals and though they, too, are imperfect humans in this imperfect world. Imperfection is built into being vegan. But so is compassion. And without that, it’s just ideology.  

All of this is in today’s episode — speaking up for animals — online and in person — without alienating people who are trying to make compassionate choices. I’ll be addressing it in this year’s Compassion in Action conference as well as in my upcoming book.

Thank you for your support and for sharing. 

How Going Zero-Waste Changed my Breakfast

Breakfast is my favorite meal. I’ve perfected my decades-long ritual of making my tea (a future post, indeed!), preparing my food, and sitting down for my morning read. This all usually comes after my morning run or workout. (Yes, I wake up early and love mornings!) 

My breakfast choices (like with all my meals) tend to change with the season — I prefer fresh fruit and smoothies in the warmer months and oatmeal in the colder months, but one thing that has filled my freezer (and belly) every day for years is Trader Joe’s frozen blueberries. Versatile, inexpensive, perfect for smoothies, oatmeal, muffins, or just eaten straight from a bowl. That’s right. One of my favorite breakfasts is a huge bowl of frozen blueberries, drizzled with some agave nectar, and tossed about with some nuts and/or seeds. However, my freezer is now devoid of these once permanent bags o’ berries.

 

Changing one of my most regular pleasurable habits is indicative of how serious I am about this zero-waste, plastic-free endeavor. Yes, I could buy fresh blueberries and freeze them, but here’s the rub: blueberries aren’t in season year-round, even in produce-rich California. 

And you know what? It turns out it’s fine, because it has forced me to make choices at the farmers market and for my breakfast that are revolved around criteria other than just simply habit or routine. Criteria that include:

  • zero-waste
  • plastic-free
  • seasonal
  • locally grown (when possible)
  • and vegan, of course

I’ve talked often of the benefits and beauty of eating seasonally, but even *I* made exceptions over the years: frozen blueberries encased in plastic being Exhibit A. And so with making choices based on all of my values — not just some of them and only when they’re convenient — I’m buying fruit at the market that’s in season rather than buying a plastic bag filled with fruit grown out of season and out of my region. 

It’s February, and the farmers markets are filled strawberries (among other fruits such as citrus and apples — yum!), and that’s what I’ve been centering my breakfasts on. And it’s been lovely. In fact, I never, ever ate oatmeal with strawberries, and now that I have, I love it!  

 

(The components of my recent breakfast: rolled oats, raw almonds, strawberries, brown sugar, cinnamon, homemade soymilk, ground flax seeds — missing from photo.)

Imagine that! Being open to something new actually reaps other rewards. Get out!  

I do very much look forward to finding blueberries again at the farmers markets (anthocyanins and all that!), and I do plan on freezing some for future consumption, but in the event that I get to have blueberries or other seasonal foods only certain times of the year makes having them all the more special. And that’s just another added bonus. 

DON’T FORGET: When you’re at the farmers market, you don’t have to take home the berries in the container they’re sold in. Simply dump them into your own reusable bag or container, and hand the basket back to the farmer. They’re happy to reuse them.

What are your favorite zero-waste breakfasts?

 

No doubt about it: blueberries not trapped in plastic are a helluva lot prettier and tastier!

What Do Vegans Eat?

If you’re vegan and you’ve ever been asked, “what do you eat?”

If you’re not vegan, and you’ve ever asked, “what do vegans eat?”

There is a very simple answer.

[Tweet “Food. It’s What Vegans Eat.”]

{RECIPE} Cauliflower Risotto with Green Veggies

After sharing a short video of this risotto on Instagram (see below), I received a number of requests for the recipe, so here it is. Long a favorite vegetable of mine, cauliflower seems to be coming into its own in the public sphere. This version of risotto may be taking liberties with risotto’s traditional foundation, but it’s much more nutrient-dense and much less calorie-dense than the Arborio rice version.

NOTE: For the version in the video, I added roasted Brussels sprouts (and didn’t add the peas and sundried tomatoes as directed below. The recipe lends itself to much variety depending on what green veggies you have on hand.)

[Tweet “{RECIPE} Enjoy this nutrient-dense, easy-to-make, delicious take on traditional risotto. YUMMERS!”]

Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 onion, diced
1 head cauliflower, pulsed in a food processor bowl to resemble rice-size pieces
3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1/2 cup (125 ml) dry white wine
1/2 cup (125 ml) vegetable stock
1/4 cup (60 ml) plant-based creamer or thick plant-based milk, such as cashew or almond
1 cup (110 g) English peas (frozen or fresh)
2 tablespoons chopped sundried tomatoes
1 tablespoon lemon zest
1/4 cup (30 g) toasted pine nuts, almond slivers, or walnut pieces
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley and/or thyme
Salt and pepper, to taste

Directions

Heat the oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onion, and sauté until translucent, about 4 minutes. Add the cauliflower and garlic, season with salt and pepper, and sauté for 3 more minutes.

Deglaze the pan with the wine and cook, stirring constantly, until the liquid is almost evaporated. Add the vegetable stock and creamer, and bring it to a simmer. Stir in the peas and sundried tomatoes, and cook until the cauliflower is tender, about 5 to 7 minutes.

Remove from heat and add the lemon zest, nuts, herbs and a drizzle of olive oil.

ROASTED BRUSSELS SPROUTS: As per the Brussels sprouts in the video, I just cut off the ends, sliced them in half, tossed them with some olive oil, salt, and pepper, and roasted them in a 425-degree oven for 15 minutes, or until they were crispy on the outside and cooked through on the inside.)

Yield: Serves 2

Soy-free, wheat-free, gluten-free

{Recipe} Homemade Vegan Sausage

Hear ye! Hear ye! These sausages are pig-free and gluten-full. I have neither a pig-full nor a gluten-free version, so enjoy this one that will blow your mind. You can also watch a video demonstration I did on a Live Facebook Broadcast. See below. 

ADVANCE PREPARATION REQUIRED to make the lentils. Brown lentils take less than 30 minutes to make from scratch, but you can use canned, if you wish. Drain first, and you’ll still want to puree them. Makes 6 sausages

Corn not included.

INGREDIENTS

1 cup cooked brown lentils, mashed or pureed
1 1/4 cups vital wheat gluten (I always buy a box of 4 packages to keep them on hand.)
1/4 cup nutritional yeast flakes
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon anise seeds (you can also use 1 tablespoon crushed fennel seeds)
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes (my favorite is chipotle)
1 teaspoon smoked paprika (regular paprika will do)
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried tarragon
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 cup vegetable broth
2 tablespoons tamari soy sauce

DIRECTIONS

Cook your lentils so you have 1 cup cooked. I always make a little more than I need for this recipe so I have another batch on hand for another. When they are cooked, puree them in a food processor or mash them by hand.

Have at the ready 6 square sheets of aluminum foil. Set aside.

Combine all the dry ingredients, then add the pureed brown lentils, the vegetable broth, and the tamari. Combine thoroughly. It will come together pretty quickly. The more you mix once it’s combined, the more you’re working the gluten, which will result in chewier sausages. You’ll get a feel for how much you want to mix the more you make these.

Divide the mixture into 6 equal parts. I usually just eyeball this, but don’t worry about being perfect; you can always break up or add to a sausage once you make one, so just do your best. (See the video for how I do it.)

Place one part of the mix onto a sheet of foil, and mold into a 6-inch log. Roll it up in the foil. Place each of the 6 sausages in a steamer, and steam for 30 minutes.

Once they’re steamed, you can store them in the refrigerator for future eating, but why would you do that? Eat now. Unwrap them, grill them up or pan-fry with a little oil. Then, stick them in a bun with all the fixings, chop them up to make sausage biscuits and gravy, or cut them up and add them to a stew. They’re absolutely delicious, and yes, your Uncle Harry will think you just fed him a sausage from a cut-up pig, so even he’ll be happy. They’re that good.

VARIATIONS

Consider this a base and vary your herbs and spices to your liking. It’s a flexible recipe waiting for your special touch. Just don’t add pigs. Thank you.

[Tweet “Check out this delicious homemade sausage recipe. Pig-free. Gluten-full. Flavor-packed.”]

Stuffed Acorn Squash with Curried Apricot Saffron Pilaf {Recipe}

This is a gorgeous, flavorful, seasonal dish that celebrates the harvest of fall and is perfect for Thanksgiving or other autumn or winter holidays. It’s prettiest served in a large pumpkin or in individual hollowed-out baby pumpkins or acorn squash that sit on each guest’s plate. Serves 6 to 8 (Modified from the Stuffed Acorn Squash in The Vegan Table.)

INGREDIENTS – SQUASH & STUFFING

4 acorn squashes
1 sweet potato or yam, chopped and steamed
1 apple, chopped or sliced
2 scallions, white part only
1/2 cup pine nuts or almond slivers, toasted
2 tablespoons finely shredded mint leaves
1/4 cup golden raisins
2 cups Saffron Basmati Rice Pilaf (see below) or brown rice

INGREDIENTS – CURRIED APRICOT DRESSING

1/4 cup apricot preserves
1/2 cup seasoned rice vinegar or champagne vinegar
1 tablespoon mild curry powder
1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/3 cup water
2 tablespoons canola oil (optional)
Salt to taste

[Tweet “Stuffed Squash with Curried Pilaf — A Perfect No-Turkeys-Were-Harmed Thanksgiving Recipe”]

INGREDIENTS – SAFFRON BASMATIC RICE PILAF

1 yellow onion, finely diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons olive oil
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon whole fennel seeds
¼ teaspoon ground pepper
1 teaspoon salt
2 cups brown basmati rice
1/2 teaspoon saffron threads steeped in 1/4 cup warm water
3-1/2 cups vegetable stock

DIRECTIONS – SQUASH

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

The first thing you want to do is cook your acorn squash. The idea is to soften the inside enough to eat it but not make it so soft that you lose the form of your pumpkin.

If you are using acorn squash or another smaller squash, cut it in half, scoop out the seeds (save and toast them!), and place the squash halves face down on a nonstick baking sheet lined with parchment. (No need to brush with oil.) Bake in the oven for 40 minutes or until the flesh is tender and can be pierced with a fork.

DIRECTIONS – RICE PILAF

While the squash is cooking, let’s get the rice going. In a medium saucepan, sauté the onion and garlic in the oil over medium heat until translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the cumin, fennel seeds, pepper, and salt. Sauté for 1 minute. Add the rice and stir constantly for 2 minutes, or until the rice smells fragrant. Add the saffron water, and 3-1/2 cups vegetable stock. Bring to a boil, and cover. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for 25 minutes or until the liquid is absorbed. Remove form heat and let sit for 10 minutes before serving.

DIRECTIONS – DRESSING & STUFFING

For the dressing: In a blender or food processor, combine all the ingredients together and blend until thoroughly combined. Taste and adjust the seasonings. Serve or refrigerate for up to 1 week.


Putting it all together:
In a large bowl, combine the rice pilaf, cooked yam, apple, scallions, and pine nuts with the dressing. Distribute evenly among the cooked squash halves. Garnish with mint.

*For seasonal recipes perfect for Thanksgiving, check out The Vegan Table, The Joy of Vegan Baking, and The 30-Day Vegan Challenge. (Signed copies available.)

Are Oysters Vegan?

I’ve heard every justification for the consumption of animals, but I was a bit stunned when I heard someone claim that vegans should eat oysters because bivalves are “basically plants.” No doubt there are grey areas in this whole attempt to live as compassionately as possible. But even the fuzzy lines are still lines. If I let you eat oysters, would you stop eating cows?

SUPPORTERS receive transcripts of all podcast episodes! Join our awesome Patreon family