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Food Waste (Part 1): How Animal Products Hinder Zero Waste Goals

We can’t talk about Zero Waste living without talking about the big picture: the amount of food that gets wasted at the front end of the food chain: during production, harvest, and processing. And we can’t talk about Zero Waste living unless we face the fact that the highest food losses are associated with livestock production. Listen to Part One to find out how there is nothing Zero Waste about garbage. (The original meaning of the word garbage had to do with “the bowels and body parts of a butchered animal considered inedible by humans — the offal.”) Enjoy!

In Part Two, we’ll talk about the food WASTE that occurs toward the back end of the food chain — at the retail and consumer levels — and what we can do about it.

Zero Waste: It Ain’t About Recycling

In this episode about my zero waste journey, I share the principles that have absolutely changed my thinking and way of living. Zero Waste is not simply about my making YouTube videos about how to make zero-waste almond milk (though I will do that!), it’s a way of thinking that profoundly changes our approach to resources and production, going beyond “waste diversion” and striving to ensure that products are designed to be repaired, refurbished, re-manufactured and reused, creating a circular economy rather than a linear economy of “make, use, dispose.”

What you will learn in this episode is that Zero Waste is not about recycling.

Recycling IS waste. Have I blown your mind yet?

The Vegan Experience: Special Announcement

The intention in my work on behalf of animals and veganism has always been to guide people to live compassionately and healthfully with joy and confidence — and without deprivation. And that’s why I offer so many opportunities for you to join me in living joyfully, fully, abundantly, compassionately, intentionally, creatively, and consciously — in other words, to enjoy The Vegan Experience. 

Clean Meat: Slaughter-Free and Sustainable

Despite the fact that animal agriculture is wreaking havoc in every way imaginable, meat consumption is on the rise. Of course, people can stop eating animal flesh and fluids and choose instead vegetables and plant-based meats and milks, but meat consumption is outpacing the rate at which people are becoming vegetarian and vegan. What if people could have their meat and eat it, too, and not cause the harm inherent in traditional agriculture? Join me today for a discussion about clean meat, the subject and title of Paul Shapiro’s new book, which I’ve dubbed “the best history of the future you’ll ever read.”

(And of course, until cellular agriculture lives up to the hype and hope, there’s always this thing called vegan.)

12-Year Podcast Anniversary: A Love-Filled Love Fest

If you ever once thought that “people don’t change,” then you’re in for quite a surprise. The stories you’re about to hear in this TWELVE-YEAR-ANNIVERSARY episode are as diverse as the people who wrote them, but they all share common threads of hope, transformation, and compassion. So relax, sit back, and take in the letters written by podcast listeners this past year whose lives have been transformed by Food for Thought. I hope you are as moved by the letters as I am humbled by them. PAIRING RECOMMENDATION: a glass of wine, a cup of tea, or a blueberry smoothie.

Thank you for all your support and love these last 12 years!

Geographical Place Names with Animal Origins

If I asked you to name some cities and countries named after animals, how many could you come up with? You might think of obvious ones, such as Buffalo NY; Beaver, UY; White Horse, NJ; or Eagle River in Ontario; or Weston-Under-Lizard near Birmingham in the UK. But what about cities and countries around the world whose animal origins are much less apparent? Join me today as we explore our connection with animals through geographical locations inspired by animals.

Supporters make this podcast possible and receive written transcripts of each an every episode. Become a supporter today. 

Animal Characteristics in Word Histories: Who They Are in What We Say

Whereas the word veal in English simply means “flesh of a calf” and pork in English means “flesh of a pig used as food,” hidden in many of the Anglo-Saxon/Old English and Proto-Indo-European words for the living animals are clues about the physical, behavioral, or vocal characteristics of the living animals, reflecting a tendency to name animals based on typical attributes or activities. 

Supporters receive written transcripts of each podcast episode. 

Gerrymander hides an animal!

Did you know that the word GERRYMANDER is an animalogy? It’s a combination of Gerry—named after the governor who 1st redrew districts in his favor— and Salamander because of the shape of the newly drawn district on the map.

 

From TheFreeDictionary.com:

Word History: In 1812, as governor of Massachusetts, Elbridge Gerry signed a bill authorizing the revision of voting districts in his state. Members of Gerry’s party redrew them in order to secure their representation in the state senate, and out of Gerry’s home county, Essex County, they carved an unlikely-looking district with the shape of a salamander. According to one version of the coining of gerrymander, the shape of the district attracted the eye of the painter Gilbert Stuart, who noticed it on a map in a newspaper editor’s office. Stuart decorated the outline of the district with ahead, wings, and claws and then said to the editor, “That will do fora salamander!” “Gerrymander!” came the reply. The image created by Stuart first appeared in the March 26, 1812, edition of theBoston Gazette, where it was accompanied by the following title: The Gerrymander. A New Species of Monster, which appeared in the Essex South District in Jan. 1812. The new word gerrymander caught on instantly—within the same year gerrymander is also recorded as a verb. (Gerry’s name, incidentally, was pronounced with a hard (g) sound, although the word which has immortalized him is now commonly pronounced with a soft (j) sound.) Gerry ran for reelection in 1812, and popular outrage directed at the flagrant use of the technique we now call gerrymandering doubtless played a role in his defeat.

For more, listen to Animalogy Podcast, which is all about the animal-related words and expressions we use every day. 

[Tweet “GERRYMANDER combines Gerry—governor who 1st redrew districts— and Salamander.”]

Who Owns the Word “Milk”?

For years, the dairy industry has been trying to make it illegal for nondairy milk companies to use the word “milk,” asserting that the word “milk” should be used to refer only to the lacteal secretions of cows. Today, I’m joined by Michele Simon, public health lawyer and director of the first trade group to represent plant-based foods companies, to talk about the history and motives behind this agenda.

Thank you for sharing and supporting Animalogy. 

Do you see the bear in ARCTIC?

Did you know that the word ARCTIC is an animalogy? It comes from the root word for “BEAR.”

OTHER BEAR-BASED ANIMALOGIES:

*the constellation Ursa Major — it means “Great Bear

*the constellation Ursa Major — it means “Little Bear

*the constellation Arcturus — it means “Guardian of the Bear

*the names Ursula and Orsa 

*the names Orson and Arthur

*the word ursine pertaining to the characteristics of bears 

For more, listen to Animalogy Podcast, which is all about the animal-related words and expressions we use every day. 

[Tweet “Did you know that the word ARCTIC is an animalogy? It comes from the root word for BEAR.”]

[Tweet “Orson, Arthur, Ursula? They’re all animalogies. They all come from the root word for BEAR.”]