Tag: vote

A Simple Reminder Makes a Huge Difference

There are SO many ways we can get involved to make sure the issues we care about — human rights, animal protection, and environmental protection — are represented in our local, state, and federal governments.⁠⠀
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One of them is by voting. ⁠⠀
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Yes, we need election reform to make sure everyone who is eligible CAN vote. Period. Full stop. ⁠⠀
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But we also need to vote … and make sure everyone who is eligible WILL vote. Because when people vote, the majority of them vote for the things we all care about — human rights, animal protection, and environmental protection.⁠⠀
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? Watch this short video about an organization I volunteer with to see if you want to get involved as well. It’s so simple, and it just takes a little time, a few words, and a stamp.
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DON’T DO NOTHING BECAUSE YOU CAN’T DO EVERYTHING. DO SOMETHING. ANYTHING. ⁠⠀

Why I Love Voting (and Why You Should, Too)!

Did you know that the U.S. trails most developed countries in voter turnout? Only about 50% of Americans show up to vote during presidential elections, which means even less during the midterms. That’s appalling to me. 

I’ve been lucky enough to not have to fight for the privilege to vote, but I still don’t take it for granted. Citizens who are eligible to vote but don’t because they complain the system is broken are squandering one of the most precious features of democracy: the peaceful exchange of power determined by the will of the people. People. Citizens. Politics. You can’t have one without the other. 

The word “politics” comes from the Greek word politikos, meaning “of citizens, pertaining to public life.”

If we’re not actively engaged in making sure the outcome is in our favor, we have no right to complain about how politics affects us—or the animals. (And by the way reading news headlines, arguing with people on Facebook, or getting depressed while you scroll through your Twitter feed does not an engaged citizen make. In fact, the more I avoid these things, the more effective and productive I am!) 

You don’t get more votes the more outraged you are. You still get just one. So step away from the headlines. Step away from social media. Take a deep breath. And vote. The animals — the least privileged, the most vulnerable citizens of our world — need us to show up for them!

[Tweet “Reading headlines and arguing with people on social media doesn’t mean you’re engaged. VOTE!”]

If you can do more than that, great! 

  • Encourage friends, family, and followers to vote! Encourage them to vote for animal-friendly candidates and ballot initiatives.
  • Phone bank! A number of us get together each week to call voting citizens of California to ensure the passage of Proposition 12.
  • Canvass door-to-door. Get involved with organizations like Democracy Action.
  • Volunteer to drive people to the polls on election day.
  • Check out my Political Guide for Animal Issues for more ways to get involved and STAY involved even after elections! 

PHONE BANKING PARTY! MAKING CALLS TO VOTERS FOR THE ANIMALS
It took no time at all to connect with the Prop 12 leaders to get set up to phone bank from the comfort of our home. We can do it any time throughout the day now, but we like to make a party of it! We each bring food, we have our laptops and phones, and we sit in different parts of the house making calls for animals. Couldn’t be easier! (Contact me if you would like to do the same!)

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Political Action Guide for Animal Issues

[Tweet “Every minute we spend being outraged is a minute we could have spent being effective.”]

Something Wayne Pacelle (CEO of the Humane Society of the United States) said in a talk I saw him give many years ago stuck with me. And he’s said it many times since. About the political arm of his organization, he said he envisions “a National Rifle Association of the animal rights movement.” Here’s the gist (excerpted from an interview in Satya Magazine):

“The way things work in Washington and in state capitols across the country is that logic and humane sensibilities can only go so far. You need them in order to be effective, but you also need to amass political power and that comes from working the political system in a way that achieves results. There’s no substitute for being able to deliver votes and having an informed constituency.

I find the NRA’s views on hunting and other issues to be really at odds with my own, but I admire the fact that they train thousands of activists across the country to achieve so much working through the system. I do think that is a model for us, because we have the potential to activate many more people than the NRA does. There are a lot of people in this country who care about guns, but I think many more people are passionate about protecting animals. If we organize them, we can achieve enormous gains and victories for animals.”

As an activist myself and a politically engaged citizen, I couldn’t agree more. There is no question that conservatives are much better organizers / organized when it comes to the issues they care about—especially at the grassroots level. Don’t underestimate the ambition of your local representatives who can not only pass effective animal-friendly legislation in your town or county but who may one day be state senator, governor, federal representative, or president. That’s how it works. 

[Tweet “Don’t underestimate the ambition of local reps who may one day be governor or president. That’s how it works. “]

We need to act. Now. We need to organize. Now. We need to be a resounding voice for animals. Now. I recoil from the phrase “now more than ever,” because our voices and votes for animals are needed all the time—not just when we’re in crisis. But I do think Americans are eager, anxious, and desperate to have their voices heard—now more than ever, so let’s do it.

[Tweet “Our voices and votes for animals are needed all the time—not just when we’re in crisis.”]

Here’s how you—we—can get started, stay engaged, make a huge difference, and help our voice for animals be as strong as the NRA’s voice is for guns. 

GENERAL

  1. The Humane Legislative Fund is dedicated to “educating elected officials and the public on animal welfare issues and electing humane candidates to public office.” Get on their mailing list, contact your representatives about the issues they highlight, make a financial contribution to give animals a voice is congress. 
  2. Use their Humane Scorecard to help you decide who to vote for in elections based on their history of animal-friendly or animal-unfriendly legislation. 
  3. Fellow dedicated and engaged activists and I are in the process of forming a political action committee called East Bay Animal PAC that will be dedicated to electing animal-friendly legislators, passing animal-friendly legislation, opposing anti-animal legislation, and educating legislators and the public on local animal issues. Join our mailing list for more, and consider creating something similar in your own city/county!
  4.  Know who your representatives are—on the federal, state, and local level. I’ve provided a guide below to help you find yours. Take a few minutes to add their phone numbers to your phone!
  5. Don’t be afraid to contact your representatives. They represent YOU! They work for YOU
  6. Read Don’t Think of an Elephant to learn how to frame your issue effectively. 
  7. Follow the cues of the Indivisible folks. Former congressional staffers wrote this guide that is meant to empower compassionate people to effectively engage politically. (One of the things they remind us of is that representatives rely on making their constituents happy so they can keep their job; i.e. get reelected. If you don’t think your voice matters, YOU’RE WRONG!)
  8. Stay hopeful. Despair is paralyzing. Cynicism is ugly. One of my favorite take-aways from the book Hope in the Dark is that the darkness doesn’t mean the future is inevitably evil. The darkness means that the future is inscrutable because it’s not yet written. It’s up to us to WRITE THE FUTURE!  

So, go write it!

[Tweet “Attending town meetings changes public discourse & legislation.”]

LOCAL

  1. Type “find my local city council member” into a search engine. 
  2. Add their phone numbers to your phone and their address to your address book. 
  3. Call them. Write to them. Get to Know Them. Let Them Get to Know YOU. Find out their positions on animal-related legislation and policies. Educate them about issues they’re most likely unaware of. Thank them for passing animal-friendly legislation. 
  4. Show up at city council meetings. 
  5. Visit them at city hall. 
  6. Donate to their campaign when it’s clear they are animal-friendly. Talk to them about animal-unfriendly positions they may have. They might just need information you have! If they stick with animal-harmful positions, tell them that’s why you’re not supporting them. 
  7. Vote for them when it’s clear they are animal-friendly. Tell them why you voted for them. 

STATE

  1. Know who your state legislators are — both in the Senate and the Assembly. Find yours here
  2. Add their phone numbers to your phone and their address to your address book. 
  3. Call them. Write to them. Find out their positions on animal-related legislation and policies. Educate them about issues they’re most likely unaware of. Thank them for passing animal-friendly legislation. 
  4. Make a date to meet with them in their district office or state capitol.  
  5. Show up at the capitol when animal-related legislation is on the agenda. Let your voice for animals be heard. 
  6. Donate to their campaign when it’s clear they are animal-friendly. Talk to them about animal-unfriendly positions they may have. They might just need information you have! If they stick with animal-harmful positions, tell them that’s why you’re not supporting them. 
  7. Vote for them when it’s clear they are animal-friendly. Tell them why you voted for them. 

FEDERAL

  1. Know who your federal members of Congress are — both in the House of Representatives as well as in the Senate. Find yours here
  2. Add their phone numbers to your phone — for both their DC office and district office.
  3. Add their email address and mailing address to your address book. 
  4. The two best ways to contact your reps are to call and write a  postcard—not an email. Buy .34-cent stamps for your postcards.
  5. Tell them what you care about. Encourage them to support animal-friendly legislation and oppose legislation that will harm animals. ASK THEM WHAT THEIR POSITION IS on a particular bill or policy. 

Democratic Actions for Animals

I love this country. I love that we have inalienable rights. I love that we can vote. I love that we can take part in the democratic process. It’s not perfect; there is a lot of work to be done, but I love being part of that work. I love being a citizen — in the broadest sense of the word.

There’s a lot of skepticism in our country right now; we spend a lot of time being critical — as we should — but personally, I feel best when I’m being critical and active. And one of the best ways we can do this is by getting involved in local causes.

I remember a time when I was embarrassed that I couldn’t tell you which neighborhood district I lived in or who my district council member was, but I aspired to become more involved. Today, my civic participation pales compared to many people who are more involved than I am, but I try to make my voice heard, especially when it comes to how my city relates to non-human animals.

Two of the things I’m most proud being involved in is stopping slaughter hobbyists from killing animals in the backyards of Oakland (see news story below about our efforts) and speaking on behalf of elephants when the Oakland City Council took up the issue of banning the bullhook, especially by companies who bring the circus to town.

 

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